Fear paradigms: The times they are a-changin’

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Fear is considered an integral part of the brain's defensive mechanism that evolved to protect animals and humans from predation and other ecological threats. Hence, it is logical to study fear from the perspective of antipredator-survival behaviors and circuits by sampling a range of threatening situations that organisms are likely to encounter in the wild. In the past several decades, however, mainstream fear research has focused on the importance of associative learning; that is, how animals become frightened of innocuous cues as consequences of their contingent pairing with aversive events. While significant discoveries have been made, contemporary fear models derived from learning studies are likely to provide only a partial picture of the brain's fear system because they cannot simulate the dynamic range of risky situations in nature that require various adaptive actions and decisions. This review considers two different approaches to study fear, grounded on behaviorism and ethology and examines their contributions in revealing the naturalistic workings of fear in guiding and shaping behavior as animals make real-world choices. © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
Publisher
ELSEVIER SCIENCE BV
Issue Date
2018-12
Language
English
Article Type
Review
Citation

CURRENT OPINION IN BEHAVIORAL SCIENCES, v.24, pp.38 - 43

ISSN
2352-1546
DOI
10.1016/j.cobeha.2018.02.007
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10203/248687
Appears in Collection
BS-Journal Papers(저널논문)
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