Heartbeat induces a cortical theta-synchronized network in the resting state

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In the resting state, heartbeats evoke cortical responses called heartbeat-evoked responses (HERs), which reflect cortical cardiac interoceptive processing. While previous studies have reported that the heartbeat evokes cortical responses at a regional level, whether the heartbeat induces synchronization between regions to form a network structure remains unknown. Using resting-state magnetoencephalography data from 85 human subjects of both genders, we first showed that heartbeat increases the phase synchronization between cortical regions in the theta frequency but not in other frequency bands. This increase in synchronization between cortical regions formed a network structure called the heartbeat-induced network (HIN), which did not reflect artificial phase synchronization. In the HIN. the left inferior temporal gyms and parahippocampal gyrus played a central role as hubs. Furthermore, the HIN was modularized, containing 5 subnetworks called modules. In particular. module I played a central role in between-module interactions in the HIN. Furthermore, synchronization within module I had a positive association with the mood of an individual. In this study, we show the existence of the HIN and its network properties, advancing the current understanding of cortical heartbeat processing and its relationship with mood, which was previously confined to region-level.
Publisher
SOC NEUROSCIENCE
Issue Date
2019-07
Language
English
Article Type
Article
Citation

ENEURO, v.6, no.4

ISSN
2373-2822
DOI
10.1523/ENEURO.0200-19.2019
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10203/267511
Appears in Collection
MSE-Journal Papers(저널논문)
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