PARADISE: Big data analytics using the DBMS tightly integrated with the distributed file system

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There has been a lot of research on MapReduce for big data analytics. This new class of systems sacrifices DBMS functionality such as query languages, schemas, or indexes in order to maximize scalability and parallelism. However, as high functionality of the DBMS is considered important for big data analytics as well, there have been a lot of efforts to support DBMS functionality in MapReduce. HadoopDB is the only work that directly utilizes the DBMS for big data analytics in the MapReduce framework, taking advantage of both the DBMS and MapReduce. However, HadoopDB does not support sharability for the entire data since it stores the data into multiple nodes in a shared-nothing manner-i.e., it partitions a job into multiple tasks where each task is assigned to a fragment of data. Due to this limitation, HadoopDB cannot effectively process queries that require internode communication. That is, HadoopDB needs to re-load the entire data to process some queries (e.g., 2-way joins) or cannot support some complex queries (e.g., 3-way joins). In this paper, we propose a new notion of the DFS-integrated DBMS where a DBMS is tightly integrated with the distributed file system (DFS). By using the DFS-integrated DBMS, we can obtain sharability of the entire data. That is, a DBMS process in the system can access any data since multiple DBMSs are run on an integrated storage system in the DFS. To process big data analytics in parallel, our approach use the MapReduce framework on top of a DFS-integrated DBMS. We call this framework PARADISE. In PARADISE, we employ a job splitting method that logically splits a job based on the predicate in the integrated storage system. This contrasts with physical splitting in HadoopDB. We also propose the notion of locality mapping for further optimization of logical splitting. We show that PARADISE effectively overcomes the drawbacks of HadoopDB by identifying the following strengths. (1) It has a significantly faster (by up to 6.41 times) amortized query processing performance since it obviates the need to re-load data required in HadoopDB. (2) It supports query types more complex than the ones supported by HadoopDB.
Publisher
SPRINGER
Issue Date
2016-05
Language
English
Article Type
Article
Citation

WORLD WIDE WEB-INTERNET AND WEB INFORMATION SYSTEMS, v.19, no.3, pp.299 - 322

ISSN
1386-145X
DOI
10.1007/s11280-014-0312-2
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10203/208735
Appears in Collection
CS-Journal Papers(저널논문)
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