Profiling good Samaritans in online knowledge forums: Effects of affiliative tendency, self-esteem, and public individuation on knowledge sharing

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Two studies investigated what motivates knowledge sharing in online knowledge forums. Based on the uses and gratifications model, we hypothesized that individuals would respond to information requests broadcast by unknown others to fulfill their needs for social interaction (affiliative tendency), to maintain a positive self-image (self-esteem), or to proclaim one's uniqueness (public individuation). Consistent with the hypotheses, a web-based survey with current users of a public knowledge sharing site found that those with stronger affiliative tendency, higher self-esteem, or stronger public individuation were more likely to contribute to the open information repository (Study 1). However, a 2 (social presence: low vs. high) x 2 (recognition rewards: absent vs. present) between-subjects design experiment also showed that these psychological traits significantly enhanced individuals' intention to share knowledge on a public web site, only when other users' presence was rendered salient and individual contributions were visibly acknowledged (Study 2).
Publisher
PERGAMON-ELSEVIER SCIENCE LTD
Issue Date
2010-11
Language
English
Article Type
Article
Citation

COMPUTERS IN HUMAN BEHAVIOR, v.26, no.6, pp.1336 - 1344

ISSN
0747-5632
DOI
10.1016/j.chb.2010.04.007
URI
http://hdl.handle.net/10203/207386
Appears in Collection
HSS-Journal Papers(저널논문)
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